no Jewish family
is ever alone
when facing terminal illness.


 

We bring together the hospice, health care and social service communities to meet the medical, cultural and spiritual needs of you and your family.

 

Meet the JHCN Rabbis – Rabbi Yerachmiel Rabin

Posted on: November 18th, 2015 by Mike
Rabbi Yerachmiel Rabin helps Stanley connect with and embrace his Jewish heritage at the Marvin & Betty Danto Family Health Care Center in West Bloomfield.

Rabbi Yerachmiel Rabin helps Stanley connect with and embrace his Jewish heritage at the Marvin & Betty Danto Family Health Care Center in West Bloomfield.

Rabbi Yerachmiel Rabin

Finding music in a Jewish soul

I want Stanley, and others like him, to feel embraced and cared for by their extended Jewish family. There are many in our community who have no one. Stanley, who lives in the Marvin and Betty Danto Health Care Center in West Bloomfield, has few visitors and no living relatives. But Stanley should be valued, for he has gifts and talents that G-d wants to see and hear.

I respect and embrace each person I meet, trying to understand them on their terms, and become a part of their journey. I hope to bring expression, meaning and happiness to their lives. I consider it my G-d given mission to make the world a brighter place, with one opportune moment, one interaction, one conversation, one person at a time. My affiliation with The Jewish Hospice & Chaplaincy Network helps me complete that mission.

To make a donation in honor of Rabbi Rabin, click here.

To read about all of the JHCN rabbis featured in this year’s annual campaign, visit: https://jewishhospice.org/annual-campaign/

 

Portrait by Monni Must, NaturallyMonni.com

Meet The Rabbis – Rabbi A. Irving Schnipper

Posted on: November 11th, 2015 by Mike
Rabbi A. Irving Schnipper

Rabbi A. Irving Schnipper

Rabbi A. Irving Schnipper

Growing up in my house in Philadelphia, my mother would say in Yiddish “You are born to be lost,” meaning once you are born you begin a journey to die. In my household, dying wasn’t something to fear. My mother sewed the shrouds we’d be buried in, and they were hung in the closet until the day they were needed. Dying is something we spent a lifetime preparing for.

I wasn’t there at the end when my mother, my father, or my brother died. Maybe that’s why it’s so important for me to do this work for JHCN, to be there for others when their loved one is dying.

I went to visit a little old lady the other day who was sitting in bed, medicated, her eyes shut tight. She was not responsive. I told her she looked cute today and she opened her eyes a little. I asked if she wanted me to say a prayer. She said no. So I started singing “You Are My Sunshine.” Her eyes got big and she broke into a smile. That’s what she needed. It’s those little moments that may seem insignificant, but it’s what she needed that day.

I’ve gained a lot of wisdom in eight decades. It begins with listening, then offering advice, saying a prayer, or acting to help a dying person or their family find peace and comfort on their terms. I’ve been a pulpit rabbi at Beth Abraham Hillel Moses; a chaplain in the Korean war; worked to plant the seeds for Second Harvest food pantry; helped ensure Jewish patients in a psych hospital received a Jewish service. What I know is this: we are all G-d’s people and we need to spend our time helping the old, the sick and the dying.

To make a donation in honor of Rabbi Schnipper, click here.

To read about all of the JHCN rabbis featured in this year’s annual campaign, visit: https://jewishhospice.org/annual-campaign/

 

Portrait by Monni Must, NaturallyMonni.com

Meet The JHCN Rabbis – Rabbi David Nelson

Posted on: November 3rd, 2015 by Mike
Rabbi David Nelson is a former rabbi at Congregation Beth Shalom. Here he offers counsel at the Oakland County Jail.

Rabbi David Nelson is a former rabbi at Congregation Beth Shalom. Here he offers counsel at the Oakland County Jail.

Rabbi David Nelson

Celebrating in moments of joy is easy. Supporting those in anguish or desperation requires reaching into the innermost part of one’s being to find compassion and understanding. It is this challenge that attracted me to the rabbinate, to chaplaincy and to prison work. My work also includes supporting hospice clients and families for JHCN, making hospital visits, and police-related chaplaincy.

I recently entered a hospital room at Beaumont and sensed the woman I had come to visit wanted to talk. I asked if there was anything she wanted to discuss. I listened as she told her life story, at times with tears. The next day I received a call from the funeral home letting me know she had died that night. I was shocked. She had been doing well and was not in critical condition. I was grateful that I had been able to be present for her on that last day.

Connecting with people in despair and enabling them to share an untold story can be a powerful healing opportunity. I have been blessed to have participated in many of these moments during my nearly fifty years in the rabbinate. Everyone has a story to tell but they don’t always have someone with whom to share it. Whether in a prison setting, a hospital room, a home, or at the cemetery with a family, these are sacred moments. I want to be there to hear that story.

To make a donation in honor of Rabbi Nelson, click here.

To read about all of the JHCN rabbis featured in this year’s annual campaign, visit: https://jewishhospice.org/annual-campaign/

 

Portrait by Monni Must, NaturallyMonni.com

Jewelry and Wearable Art Sale to Benefit JHCN

Posted on: November 3rd, 2015 by Mike

jhcn jewelry event

Do some holiday shopping

Support local artists

Perform a mitzvah for this vital organization

Join a talented and generous collection of artistic stars for a designer jewelry and accessory wearable art sales event with 20 percent of the proceeds benefiting The Jewish Hospice & Chaplaincy Network. Featuring the artistic creations of: Olga Babushkina, Carol Ellis, Linda Golden, Arlene Lullove, Kathy Mamat, Diane Mondry and Laurie Winston.

Save The Date

Sunday, November 15 from 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. and Monday, November 16 from 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Please Call 248-705-5390 or 248-855-9554 for directions.

About the Artists:

Olga Babushkina has a longstanding passion for the art of decorative wardrobe and attire, as a means to self-expression. Her necklaces are large statement pieces that are made from very high quality materials. She specializes in natural stones like Turquoise, corals, quartz and amber highlighted with antique silver from India, Thailand, Afghanistan and Nepal. Her gemstones are unique to every artistic creation and she expresses her knowledge of high fashion with a sophisticated approach to style. No surprise, since Olga is a trained chemist who understands the unique relationship between art, creativity and natural elements.

Carol Ellis is an active and prolific knitwear teacher and designer. She shares her love of craft by creating various materials and techniques that produce textiles and artwork that are “outside the box.” Carol currently teaches at the Birmingham Community House as well as the Bloomfield Village Club. She is a patient and creative teacher, who has instilled the love of knitting to people all over the State. Her knitted accessories are unique and very practical as well as beautiful. Carol also produces vintage inspired jewelry and antique purses. She works in a variety of materials to create unusual combinations that are very special. Her one-of-a-kind designs give new meaning to contemporary wearable craft.

Linda Golden is a well-known and highly successful interior designer in Michigan, Florida and Arizona. About 15 years ago, a client introduced Linda to jewelry design and a passion was born. Today, her work is featured at the Whitespace Collections Gallery, West Palm Beach, Florida. Her work has also appeared at Art-Palm Beach, Art Wynwood-Miami. It will be appearing there again this year. One-of-a-kind, mixed-media pieces are created in collaboration with Florida jewelry designer Jane Levy, and are in many private collections throughout the country.

Arlene Lullove is a fiber artist currently making one-of-a-kind women’s purses as well as felted silk and hand-dyed scarves. She works in fabrics of all kinds including leather, faux leather, suede and fur. Arlene is the former owner & partner of Blinds & Designs, Inc., the multi-state wholesale fabricator of blinds, shades and shutters. She spent her career creating commercial textiles and manufacturing window treatment under the Hunter Douglas brand and exclusive private labels. Her expertise in textiles fueled her passion for wearable art in a variety of mediums geared for the fashion forward, sophisticated woman. Arlene’s silk & wool designs have been featured in exhibits at the Birmingham Bloomfield Art Center. Her textile apparel and accessories are in private collections throughout the United States.

Kathy Mamat is a jewelry designer with 25 years of professional experience. She was the manager and buyer at Beadworks in Franklin, Michigan. She is currently the owner of Kathy Mamet Designs, a new studio in Franklin, located inside the retail store Glamour Puss. Kathy designs, sells and repairs one-of-a-kind jewelry. Her work is unique, highly praised and featured in Beadwork Magazine, Bead Style and Beader’s Stash: Designs from America’s Favorite Beadshops. Kathy teaches and sells her work at her studio in Franklin.

Diane Mondry has a passion for design and fashion. She entered the fashion business as a buyer for Marshall Fields in Chicago. She is well known for Diane M., a women’s clothing and accessory boutique she opened in Birmingham after moving back to Michigan. The Diane M. Jewelry Collection is a labor of love to create chic and relaxed pieces that women will enjoy owning and wearing. Diane designs and creates jewelry that is the perfect balance of understated elegance. She lives in Bloomfield Hills with her husband, three children and Ellie, the cutest dog ever.

Laurie Winston is a jewelry and accessories artist whose expertise in knitting, crocheting, mosaic and needlepoint has enabled her to collect and research materials and crafts from around the world. She creates unique beadworks in all types that may be worn or displayed. Laurie may be best known for her vintage and antique beaded purse designs and patterns. She created unique patterns and designs and taught for 17 years in Franklin, Michigan. Her own collection of antique frames and vintage beaded designs has been on display in many Florida art shows. She lives in Michigan and Florida, shops for, collects and creates wearables for sale to benefit many fundraising causes.

Journey of the Soul

Posted on: October 22nd, 2015 by Mike

Journey of the Soul

 

JHCN is a proud co-sponsor of Journey of the Soul: An Exploration of Life, Death and What Lies Beyond, a six-week course at Bais Chabad of West Bloomfield. Participants can earn up to 7.5 AMA, APA, NASW, and CBBS continuing education credits in joint sponsorship with the Washington School of Psychiatry.
Learn more or register here:

Course Overview

What is a soul? Where does it go after it departs this world? Do Jews believe in heaven and hell? Can souls communicate with us from the afterlife? How does reincarnation work?

Journey of the Soul explores the mysteries surrounding the spiritual dimension of our existence—our destiny that continues even after we’ve shed our earth-bound body suit. We examine the transition of the soul into the hereafter, the kinds of legacies that are valued even after we’ve forsaken this earthly existence, and the accompanying emotional journey and rituals that help the soul and those closest to it prepare for its new reality.

Besides for providing answers to life’s biggest questions, Journey of the Soul will inspire you to remain focused on the parts of life that really matter; it will assist you in becoming more in touch with yourself, with your soul, and with your spiritual dimension; and it will help you discover a newfound relationship with your loved ones who are no longer here with us in body.

Course Outline

LIFE
What is a soul? Is it possible to expire before our time is up? Is death painful for the soul? How does Judaism define life? How do we reconcile Judaism’s emphasis on the here and now with the eternality of the soul?

PREPARATION
Are there benefits to aging? What matters most in life? Realizing that we only live once, what is the best way to utilize the time we have left?

TRANSITION
What happens to us when we die? Are souls able to communicate with us from heaven? Do our loved ones in heaven still care about us? What is the significance of the rituals associated with burial? How do these rituals assist the soul’s transition into the afterlife?

AFTERLIFE
What is reincarnation? How exactly does it work? Does Judaism believe in ghosts and spirits? Does everyone go to heaven ?

MOURNING
Once the soul is in heaven, is it possible for it ascend to new spiritual heights? What can we do to assist the soul in the afterlife? This lesson explores the emotional, spiritual, and practical steps of the grieving process and explains how we can benefit the soul once it’s already in the hereafter.

THE END GAME
What is the final destination on this voyage? Is death permanent? Does Judaism believe in resurrection? Is it possible that we may one day be reunited with our loved ones?

Accreditation

In joint sponsorship with the Washington School of Psychiatry (WSP)
Earn up to 7.5 CE credits from:
> The American Psychological Association (APA)
> The American Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME)
> The California Board of Behavioral Sciences (CBBS)
> The Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB)

Meet The JHCN Rabbis – Rabbi Hershel Klainberg

Posted on: October 16th, 2015 by Mike
Rabbi Klainberg at the Holocaust Memorial Center Zekelman Campus in Farmington Hills.

Rabbi Hershel Klainberg at the Holocaust Memorial Center Zekelman Campus in Farmington Hills.

Rabbi Hershel Klainberg

I was born in a Displaced Persons Camp in Germany, the only child of Holocaust survivors. While I provide care and comfort to any hospice patient, there is a special place in my heart for Shoah survivors and their families.

Each survivor represents their departed loved ones, and a stolen world and way of life. My ability to speak Yiddish and to connect with the hearts and souls of our remaining survivors allows me entrée into their homes at the end of their precious lives. With each patient and family, I hope to ease some of their fears, and to help give them the closure and peace they deserve. Each of them lost many family members in the Shoah, to tragic, horrible deaths. If I can make a difference at the end, even for one person, my work has been valuable and meaningful. I know my parents, may they rest in peace, would be proud.

To make a donation in honor of Rabbi Klainberg, click here.

To read about all of the JHCN rabbis featured in this year’s annual campaign, visit: https://jewishhospice.org/annual-campaign/

 

Portrait by Monni Must, NaturallyMonni.com

Meet The JHCN Rabbis – Rabbi Rachel Shere

Posted on: October 6th, 2015 by Mike
Rabbi Shere leads Soulful Yoga classes for Adat Shalom members where she also serves as a pulpit rabbi.

Rabbi Shere leads Soulful Yoga classes for Adat Shalom members where she also serves as a pulpit rabbi.

Rabbi Rachel Shere

When physicians tell a family “there is nothing more that can be done for your loved one,” they are speaking from a limited perspective. Even when a person’s life is coming to a close, there is often much to do. Individuals and families do some of their most meaningful growing and loving during this period.

Hospice work, to me, is about shepherding the soul from this world to the next — peacefully, comfortably and with love. One of my favorite Jewish prayers is “Tefillat Haderech,” commonly known as “The Traveler’s Prayer.” It is typically recited before embarking on a journey. When I sit at the bedside of a hospice patient, we recite this prayer then talk about the journey their soul will soon be making.

I see death not as an end, but as a transition from this world to the next. I feel blessed through my work with JHCN to guide people embarking upon this most profound journey and to have had the opportunity to be there at the incredibly holy moment when the soul, which has spent years tethered to the body, is called home. I am grateful to be a part of this sacred work.

To make a donation in honor of Rabbi Shere, click here.

To read about all of the JHCN rabbis featured in this year’s annual campaign, visit: https://jewishhospice.org/annual-campaign/

 

Portrait by Monni Must, NaturallyMonni.com

Meet The JHCN Rabbis

Posted on: September 15th, 2015 by Mike

Meet The JHCN Rabbis

Portraits by Monni Must, NaturallyMonni.com

krakoff_744A1449

Rabbi Joseph H. Krakoff joined the JHCN family in August 2014.

Rabbi Joseph H. Krakoff

Jewish tradition understands the family as the central unit and influence in life. There is nothing more important and special to me than my family. I look forward to spending time with my wife and three children whenever possible. Perhaps it is because family means so much to me that working with JHCN feels as if I have become part of a larger family on two levels. First, in fulfilling the sacred responsibility of being with individuals and their loved ones at the end of life, I am so often welcomed in as a trusted extended member of their family which I take seriously and never for granted. So too, since joining the JHCN team just one year ago, I have discovered that this special group of kind, loving individuals operates like a family of caregivers and advisors each and every day, and it is evident to all how deeply they all care about not only their patients, but also for one another. JHCN gives me the opportunity to celebrate family in so many ways and for that I will be forever grateful.

To make a donation in honor of Rabbi Krakoff, click here.

Rabbi Yisrael Pinson

Rabbi Yisrael Pinson

Rabbi Yisrael Pinson

I come from a long line of activist rabbis who migrate across the world to where we are most needed. Born in France, I lived in many countries before settling in Michigan, where I ran Friendship House. Helping people recover from drug and alcohol addiction, I was frequently exposed to sudden, tragic deaths. Now that I am working for JHCN, I am grateful for the opportunity to offer support to those who still have time left in the last phases of life.

I currently live in the downtown Detroit Chabad House. I visit Jewish patients at various hospitals in the city, and showcase Detroit as a welcoming place for Jews to work, live, play or get medical care. I am also the rabbi for Seasons Hospice, and spend time with patients all over the metropolitan area.

The very best part of my job is connecting with someone who has lost touch with their Jewish roots and pulling them closer to Jewish life. Often, this meaningful closure happens at the very end of a life, and is dramatic and emotional for the patient, their family, and also for me. It is in my DNA to go where I am needed, and my work in Michigan certainly fits the bill.

To make a donation in honor of Rabbi Pinson, click here.

Rabbi Jennifer Kaluzny serves as a pulpit rabbi at Temple Israel in West Bloomfield. Here she shares time on the trail with her children.

Rabbi Jennifer Kaluzny serves as a pulpit rabbi at Temple Israel in West Bloomfield. Here she shares time on the trail with her children.

Rabbi Jennifer Kaluzny

I once had a teacher who taught us we should go through life as though we are amateur anthropologists. He implored us to study our surroundings, to ask questions, to attempt to fit into whatever culture we found ourselves in: be it geographical, familial, or congregational. His advice serves me well. Yes, I am a rabbi, and a chaplain. But most of all, I am an anthropologist.

In the work I do every day, I collect people’s stories and honor their memories. I learn what gives comfort, what heals, and what makes a difference in the life of a dying person and their family. I glean sacred knowledge from each person and each family I serve. Perhaps without realizing it, they in turn, teach me.

I hope I can also teach my children to be amateur anthropologists to complement whatever paths they choose. If they truly listen to the experiences of others, their lives will be richer in color and saturated with meaning. JHCN has been my greatest classroom. I do this work because I love the people I meet, and their stories, and I feel honored to hear every single one.

To make a donation in honor of Rabbi Kaluzny, click here.

freeman_study_744a1323

Study at the Kollel, Oak Park, Michigan

Rabbi E.B. (Bunny) Freedman

I am often asked how I can deal with being around death and dying every day. The answer is, this is the most rewarding work I have ever been privileged to be part of. When families invite me into their homes to make beside visits, I know I am entering their most sacred space. The trust and honor imparted to me is immeasurable. The reason I get out of bed each day is to make sure no Jew faces the end of life alone. My personal commitment to this cause begins with patients, extends to their families, and grows to include building bridges with donors, volunteers, staff, board members, partner agencies, and medical professionals. This work can be quite demanding, and there are three constants essential to maintaining my mental and physical fitness: the love I give to and receive from my family, regular, rigorous exercise and vigorous daily Torah study. I owe it to myself and those who count on me – our patients, their families, and my team — to be physically, mentally and spiritually prepared for this work.

To make a donation in honor of Rabbi Freedman, click here.

Rabbi Yerachmiel Rabin helps Stanley connect with and embrace his Jewish heritage at the Marvin & Betty Danto Family Health Care Center in West Bloomfield.

Rabbi Yerachmiel Rabin helps Stanley connect with and embrace his Jewish heritage at the Marvin & Betty Danto Family Health Care Center in West Bloomfield.

Rabbi Yerachmiel Rabin

Finding music in a Jewish soul

I want Stanley, and others like him, to feel embraced and cared for by their extended Jewish family. There are many in our community who have no one. Stanley, who lives in the Marvin and Betty Danto Health Care Center in West Bloomfield, has few visitors and no living relatives. But Stanley should be valued, for he has gifts and talents that G-d wants to see and hear.

I respect and embrace each person I meet, trying to understand them on their terms, and become a part of their journey. I hope to bring expression, meaning and happiness to their lives. I consider it my G-d given mission to make the world a brighter place, with one opportune moment, one interaction, one conversation, one person at a time. My affiliation with The Jewish Hospice & Chaplaincy Network helps me complete that mission.

To make a donation in honor of Rabbi Rabin, click here.

 

Rabbi Klainberg at the Holocaust Memorial Center Zekelman Campus in Farmington Hills.

Rabbi Hershel Klainberg at the Holocaust Memorial Center Zekelman Campus in Farmington Hills.

Rabbi Hershel Klainberg

I was born in a Displaced Persons Camp in Germany, the only child of Holocaust survivors. While I provide care and comfort to any hospice patient, there is a special place in my heart for Shoah survivors and their families.

Each survivor represents their departed loved ones, and a stolen world and way of life. My ability to speak Yiddish and to connect with the hearts and souls of our remaining survivors allows me entrée into their homes at the end of their precious lives. With each patient and family, I hope to ease some of their fears, and to help give them the closure and peace they deserve. Each of them lost many family members in the Shoah, to tragic, horrible deaths. If I can make a difference at the end, even for one person, my work has been valuable and meaningful. I know my parents, may they rest in peace, would be proud.

To make a donation in honor of Rabbi Klainberg, click here.

Shapiro_744A1342

Rabbi Avie Shapiro

I have been visiting hospice patients for 26 years, but in many ways I have prepared for this work for a lifetime. My father, an orthodox rabbi, made visiting nursing homes and hospitals a part of his daily routine. He often took my brother and me to shivah houses for evening services, where, at a young age, I became sensitive to the emotional pain of others’ grief.

When I became a rabbi, I realized that many of my peers shied away from visiting the sick, attending funerals or making shivah visits. For me, however, it was second nature.

Working with the elderly and hospice patients is very much a part of who I am. I have developed deep friendships with many patients and their families. Many have become extensions of my own family. When a patient dies, it often feels to me like the loss of a family member. My friendships with their survivors frequently continues for years to come.
The names of the people I have had the honor to visit, carry significant reminders of a relationship treasured, enjoyed, then lost but never forgotten.

To make a donation in honor of Rabbi Shapiro, click here.

Rabbi David Nelson is a former rabbi at Congregation Beth Shalom. Here he offers counsel at the Oakland County Jail.

Rabbi David Nelson is a former rabbi at Congregation Beth Shalom. Here he offers counsel at the Oakland County Jail.

Rabbi David Nelson

Celebrating in moments of joy is easy. Supporting those in anguish or desperation requires reaching into the innermost part of one’s being to find compassion and understanding. It is this challenge that attracted me to the rabbinate, to chaplaincy and to prison work. My work also includes supporting hospice clients and families for JHCN, making hospital visits, and police-related chaplaincy.

I recently entered a hospital room at Beaumont and sensed the woman I had come to visit wanted to talk. I asked if there was anything she wanted to discuss. I listened as she told her life story, at times with tears. The next day I received a call from the funeral home letting me know she had died that night. I was shocked. She had been doing well and was not in critical condition. I was grateful that I had been able to be present for her on that last day.

Connecting with people in despair and enabling them to share an untold story can be a powerful healing opportunity. I have been blessed to have participated in many of these moments during my nearly fifty years in the rabbinate. Everyone has a story to tell but they don’t always have someone with whom to share it. Whether in a prison setting, a hospital room, a home, or at the cemetery with a family, these are sacred moments. I want to be there to hear that story.

To make a donation in honor of Rabbi Nelson, click here.

Rabbi A. Irving Schnipper

Rabbi A. Irving Schnipper

Rabbi A. Irving Schnipper

Growing up in my house in Philadelphia, my mother would say in Yiddish “You are born to be lost,” meaning once you are born you begin a journey to die. In my household, dying wasn’t something to fear. My mother sewed the shrouds we’d be buried in, and they were hung in the closet until the day they were needed. Dying is something we spent a lifetime preparing for.

I wasn’t there at the end when my mother, my father, or my brother died. Maybe that’s why it’s so important for me to do this work for JHCN, to be there for others when their loved one is dying.

I went to visit a little old lady the other day who was sitting in bed, medicated, her eyes shut tight. She was not responsive. I told her she looked cute today and she opened her eyes a little. I asked if she wanted me to say a prayer. She said no. So I started singing “You Are My Sunshine.” Her eyes got big and she broke into a smile. That’s what she needed. It’s those little moments that may seem insignificant, but it’s what she needed that day.

I’ve gained a lot of wisdom in eight decades. It begins with listening, then offering advice, saying a prayer, or acting to help a dying person or their family find peace and comfort on their terms. I’ve been a pulpit rabbi at Beth Abraham Hillel Moses; a chaplain in the Korean war; worked to plant the seeds for Second Harvest food pantry; helped ensure Jewish patients in a psych hospital received a Jewish service. What I know is this: we are all G-d’s people and we need to spend our time helping the old, the sick and the dying.

To make a donation in honor of Rabbi Schnipper, click here.

Caring Coalition 2016 Features Sopolsky, Lynn and Payne

Posted on: September 10th, 2015 by Mike

 

Save The Date!

 

 

The 9th Annual Shenkman-Weisberg Caring Coalition Conference

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Congregation Shaarey Zedek • Southfield, Michigan

Joanne Lynn, MD, MS, MA,  Robert Sopolsky, MD, Richard Payne, MD

Joanne Lynn, MD, MS, MA, Robert Sopolsky, MD, Richard Payne, MD

The Best Care Possible – Achieving Excellence,The 9th annual Shenkman-Weisberg Caring Coalition Conference, to be held on Wednesday, March 30, 2016 in Southfield, Michigan, will feature world-class speakers Robert Sopolsky, MD, Richard Payne, MD, and Joanne Lynn, MD, MA, MS.

About Robert Sopolsky, MD

Dr. Sopolsky is an American neuroendocrinologist, professor of biology, neuroscience, and neurosurgery at Stanford University, researcher and author. He is currently a Professor of Biological Sciences, and Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences and, by courtesy, Neurosurgery, at Stanford University. In addition, he is a Research Associate at the National Museums of Kenya. Sapolsky has received numerous honors and awards for his work, including the prestigious MacArthur Fellowship genius grant in 1987, an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, and the Klingenstein Fellowship in Neuroscience. Dr. Sapolsky, who writes for the Wall Street Journal and The New Yorker is the author of many books, including Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers, The Trouble with Testosteron, and Monkeyluv and Other Essays on our Lives as Animals.

About Joanne Lynn, MD, MA, MS

Dr. Lynn is a geriatrician, hospice physician, health services researcher, quality improvement advisor, and policy advocate who has focused upon shaping American health care so that every person can count on living comfortably and meaningfully through the period of serious illness and disability in the last years of life, at a sustainable cost to the community. She now leads the Center on Elder Care and Advanced Illness for Altarum Institute.

About Richard Payne, MD

Dr. Payne is an internationally known expert in the areas of pain relief, care for those near death, oncology and neurology. Payne has served on numerous panels and advisory committees, many at the national level. He has given expert testimony to the Congressional Black Caucus National Brain Trust and the President’s Cancer Panel in the area of healthcare access disparities in cancer care, palliative medicine and end-of-life care. He also has received a Distinguished Service Award from the American Pain Society, of which he is president; the Humanitarian Award from the Urban Resources Institute; and the Janssen Excellence in Pain Award.

The Caring Coalition

The Best Care Possible – Achieving Excellence conference will bring together nurses, social workers, clergy, physicians, case managers, nursing home administrators, and other health care professionals from Southeast Michigan and bordering states. The conference is presented by the Caring Coalition, a diverse group of Southeast Michigan hospices, hospitals and community organizations. The Coalition dedicates its efforts to educating health care professionals and the general public about issues related to hospice and palliative care. The more than 70 members of the Caring Coalition have worked together since 2008 to present accredited conferences featuring nationally known and local experts and have each attracted more than 800 health care professionals.

Previous Conferences

The 2015 conference, Caring for the Whole Person, feature national presenters Immaculée Ilibagiza, Rwandan author and motivational speaker, David Kessler, thanatologist, bioethicist and author, Sofia MerajverMD, PhD, physician scientist, and Dale Larson, PhD, psychologist specializing in end of life care. The 2014 conference, Coping with Pain, Loss and Suffering, featured journalist and author Joshua Prager, physicians Stacie Pinderhughes and Michael Levy, and local grief survivor Gary Weinstein. The 2013 conference, Values, Ethics and Culture at End of Life, with keynote speaker bioethicist Arthur Caplan, focused on the impact of values and ethics on end of life experiences. The 2012 conference, On My Terms: Patient Directed Care focused on patient centered care, and featured nationally recognized hospice physician and author Ira Byock, M.D. Our 2011 conference, The Science of Comfort Care, explored evidence-based practices and philosophies offering comfort to those affected by chronic and life-limiting illness. The 2010 conference, Handle with Care: Powerful Compassionate Care Giving drew attendees to a conversation about best practices in caregiving. In 2009, our conference, The War on Pain, addressed the under treatment of pain in patients with chronic and terminal illness. In 2008, The Same But Differentsymposium explored the similarities and differences in rituals and customs practiced by different faiths at the end of life. We expect the 2015 event to attract similar numbers of health care professionals whose work requires them to understand the issues related to serious and life limiting illness. Our attendees serve the physical and emotional health needs of thousands of patients and their families throughout Southeast Michigan and bordering states.

Good – But Not Good Enough

Posted on: June 19th, 2015 by Mike

Building Better Nursing Homes

After plenty of isolated successes, the question isn’t what good nursing homes look like, but how to transform existing facilities into places that look like them.

 

greenhouse project copy
By ALANA SEMUELS for The Atlantic

 

The woman Barry Berman saw sitting in the dining room of the nursing home was not his mother.

 

Or, at least, she was his mother, but didn’t look anything like her. His mother was vivacious, or she had been until she was felled by a massive stroke and then pneumonia, so he’d moved her into a nursing home so she could recuperate. He knew he could trust the nursing home, since he ran it, and knew it was lauded for the efficiency with which it served residents. But when he went to look for his mother a day or two after he moved her in, he barely recognized her.

 

“I’ll never forget the feeling as long as I live,” he told me. “I said, ‘Oh my God, there’s my mother, this old woman, in a wheelchair, lifeless. Look what my own nursing home did to my own mother in a matter of days.”

 

Berman had run assisted living and nursing complexes for 23 years before this moment, but it completely changed the way he thought about how to care for the elderly. He moved his mother home immediately, arranged for home-care aides to come to her, and then set about to completely upending the way his organization, Chelsea Jewish Foundation, cared for its aging patients. Read more here… .

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